Digital Archives and Collections. Creating Online Access to Indian Cultural Heritage

Note (03.07.2023): Unfortunately, the event has been cancelled. The eleventh event of the lecture series "Short Videos as Memory Practice: Remembering with Kuaishou" on 11.07.2023 will take place as planned.

Event 10/11 of the lecture series "Digitalization of Memory Practices and Heritage in Global Perspectives" in the summer semester 2023

On the lecture series

How has digitalization changed the way we remember personally and collectively? Through their omnipresence, digital applications and infrastructures seem to be reshaping memory culture and practices around the globe. Mobile devices and cloud services enable individuals to access images, texts, and video recordings from the past anywhere and anytime. Collections are being digitalized and made more accessible. During the Corona Pandemic, museums offered virtual tours. Governments are also using digital tools increasingly to shape authoritative cultural heritage and public discourses on identity and history. 

Digitalization does not only facilitate a greater diversity of memories and voices. Digitalization also challenges conventions and can enables manipulation and selection of content. The consequences with which the intersection between technologies and cultures has been set in motion can be best discussed by comparing memory & heritage practices in different societies and world regions. How is the personal ability to remember changing and which materials are becoming new and differently accessible for remembering? What kind of influence do platforms and social media have on forms of memory in rural Africa or hyper-urban China? How does digital creativity differ in remembering in Europe, Latin America and Africa? How do digital tools enable us to perceive everyday culture on the one hand and global interconnections such as colonialism, climate change, and geopolitics on the other hand? Does the relationship between cultures of memory and digital technologies differ significantly or are they similar in African, American, European, and Asian countries?

DoM_10
© CASSIS

Schedule

Lecture:

Prof. Dr. Katja Müller

Lecturer of Social Anthropology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg & Visiting Professor at the University of Technology, Sydney

Discussion:

Prof. Dr. Karoline Noack

Professor of Anthropology of the Americas, University of Bonn & Co-Speaker of the Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies

Prof. Dr. Katja Müller

Moderation:

Antonia Kranz, B. A.

Research Assistant "Infrastructures of Chinese Modernity", Center for Advanced Security, Strategic and Integration Studies, University of Bonn

Further Information

In cooperation with the Meertens Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences. Supported by the TRA 5 of the University of Bonn and by the Ministry of Culture and Science of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia.


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