2022.04.14 Maximilian Mayer.jpeg
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Prof. Dr. Maximilian Mayer

Junior-Professor of International Relations and Global Politics of Technology

Contact

E-Mail: maximilian.mayer@uni-bonn.de
Phone: +49 (0)228/73-5640
Address: Römerstraße 164, D-53117 Bonn, Room 4.011b
Website: Institut für Politische Wissenschaft und Soziologie
Twitter: @mayer_iras


Office hours and profile

Office hours

During the Covid-19 pandemic office hours will be held online (via Zoom or Skype) every Thursday from 10:00-11:30 am or by appointment. Registration via email (nock@uni-bonn.de) required. Contact: Room 4.011b, Phone: +49 (0)228 73 5640.

Regular office hours (4.011b): Tuesday 9:00-13:00 and Wednesday 13:00-17:00.

Profile

Dr. Maximilian Mayer is Junior-Professor of International Relations and Global Politics of Technology at University of Bonn. He was assistant professor at the University of Nottingham Ningbo China (2019-2020). He is also research fellow at Renmin University Beijing (2018-2020), worked as Research Professor at Tongji University, Shanghai (2015-2018) and was senior researcher at the Munich Center for Technology in Society, Technical University Munich (2018-2019). Maximilian worked at the Bonn University’s Center for Global Studies (CGS) as managing assistant and senior fellow (2009-2015). Maximilian holds a master degree from Ruhr University Bochum and obtained his PhD at Bonn University. His research interests include the global politics of science, innovation, and technology; China’s foreign and energy policy; global energy and climate politics; theories of International Relations. Maximilian presents regularly at international conferences, publishes his research in peer-reviewed journals, and has authored seven books including China’s Energy Thirst: Myth or Reality? (2007 together with Xuewu Gu), Changing orders: transdiciplinary analysis of global and local realities (2008, co-editer), two-volumes on The Global Politics of Science and Technology (2014, lead editor). He is coeditor of Art and Sovereignty in Global Politics (Palgrave, 2016) and edited Rethinking the Silk-Road: Chinas Belt and Road Initiative and Emerging Eurasian Relations (Palgrave, 2018). Maximilian was visiting scholar at Harvard Kennedy School, Program on Science, Technology and Society, and section co-chair of STAIR (Science, Technology, Arts and international relations) of the International Studies Association (2015-2017) and STAIR program chair (2014-2015). Furthermore, he is part of the research group The Second Cold War Observatory.

Full CV here. More information on the website of the Institute for Political Science and Sociology.


Research Interests

  • Role of science and technology in International Relations 
  • Chinas foreign and energy politics 
  • Global enviroment and climate politics 

Research Projects and Events

Ongoing Research Projects

Former Research Projects


Events


Current teaching


Team

Avatar Cramer

Dr. Katharina C. Cramer

Avatar van Helden

Merle van Helden

Avatar Nock

Philip Nock

+49 228 73-5642

Avatar Schmitz

Frederik Schmitz

+49 228 73-60191

Avatar Zhu

Ningjie Zhu

+49 151 54351969

Publications
Infrastructuring Cyberspace: Exploring China’s Imaginary and Practices of Selective Connectivity

Nicolas Huppenbauer, Dr. Ying Huang and Prof. Maximilian Mayer explore the tension between digital fragmentations and connectivity in Chinese cyberspace and introduce a new term "selective connectivity".

South Korea's Response to COVID-19: Lessons for Pandemic Preparedness and Agile Crisis Management

Prof. Maximilian Mayer and Ga Young Lee are examining the genesis of South Korea's proactive pandemic management and the resulting learning processes.

China's Engagement in Africa: Activities, Effects and Trends

Prof. Dr. Maximilian Mayer writes on China's technological influence in Africa as part of a Center for Global Studies publication.

Digital currencies, monetary sovereignty, and U.S.–China power competition

Prof. Dr. Maximilan Mayer and Dr. Ying Huang discuss digital currencies, monetary sovereignty, and U.S.–China power competition in their new research article. 

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